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The development of a powered low draught tine cultivator
- Sep 01, 2017 -

           The development of a powered low draught tine cultivator


Abstract

A method is presented for quantifying the performance of both surface and sub-surface soil cutting tools. This simplified assessment of real field conditions is based on recent developments in soil cutting theory. The cultivating action of a vertically displaced embedded cutting surface is shown by this analysis to outperform present-day deep tilling tools. The vertical lift cutting action capitalises on the inherent weakness of soil when subjected to tension and is in sharp contrast to the shear failure that most modern deep tilling passive tools achieve by projecting predominantly compressive stresses into the soil. The vertically displaced cutting tool requires an intermittent up-and-down path through the soil and this paper discusses several practical ways of guiding the cutting surface along this trajectory from a moving tractor. To achieve this, the cutting surface is shown to trace a triangular path relative to the moving tractor and the new powered implement is referred to as a ‘deltavator’. The paper discusses the development of the deltavator concept and presents typical results of both laboratory and field tests on several versions of this machine. These prototype implements are a long way from the ideal design specifications but their performance is, nevertheless most encouraging. Inherent low draught, the ability to cultivate deep, and the intrinsic capability for generating large volumes of deeply fissured soil are the main attributes of the deltavator system. However, these characteristics must be viewed in the light of the complexity of the mechanism required to power the implement.